The government is temporarily suspending eviction hearings as a result of the COVID-19 emergency.

Beginning March 25th, the Office of Residential Tenancies (ORT) will not be accepting applications for eviction related to missed or late rent, or for other non-urgent claims. Previous eviction orders for non-urgent matters (i.e. – not related to health and safety concerns) will not be enforced, and previously scheduled hearings for non-urgent matters have been cancelled as of today.

The ORT will only be conducting eviction hearings for urgent situations where there is a potential risk to health or safety resulting from violence or damage to property. Hearings may also take place for situations where a tenant has been locked out by their landlord or where a landlord has been accused of not providing essential services such as power and water.

“Under the circumstances, we want to ensure that tenants facing hardship as a result of COVID-19 can remain in their homes and follow all orders and recommendations from the Chief Medical Officer,” Justice Minister and Attorney General Don Morgan said.

“An essential part of flattening the curve is staying home and self-isolating. We want to provide peace of mind that those taking the necessary precautions as a result of this unprecedented situation will still have a roof over their head.”

Tenants who are unable to pay their rent during the state of emergency will be expected to pay their rent in full once the state of emergency is over. This action is being taken in recognition of the fact that our province is currently in an unprecedented state of emergency that may result in unforeseen financial hardship or health consequences for tenants.

Government is specifically concerned that evicted tenants will be unable to self-isolate or physically distance themselves from others, potentially increasing the risk of transmitting or contracting COVID-19.

The ORT continues to encourage landlords and tenants to communicate with each other about their individual situations so that they can come to mutually agreeable solutions in this challenging time.

Source: Government of Saskatchewan.

 

More Local News

POLL: What should be done with the Natatorium?

With plans on replacing the Phyllis Dewar outdoor pool, the City of Moose Jaw will be decommissioning the Natatorium in the near future. The Depression Era building used to be the hub of the city as…

Meili stepping down as MLA

NDP Opposition leader Ryan Meili has announced Thursday that he will be stepping down as the MLA for Saskatoon Meewasin as of July 1. Meili, a native of Moose Jaw, was first elected to the Saskatoon…

[VIDEO] City holds Public Works open house

Residents got an up-close look at some of the heavy equipment the city uses during a Public Works open house on Wednesday at the City Complex. The open house is part of Public Works Week from May 15…

Fishing regulations, regions and reasons for 2022

A new fishing season has begun, and that means new regulations to help keep even the swiftest of currents protected from overfishing. As with every year, 2022 has some changes here and there…

Crescent Park playground temporarily closed

The Crescent Park Playground will be temporarily closed to allow contractors to replace the wood decking in the spray park and playground area. The project, which includes the installation of a…

DiscoverMooseJaw.com is Moose Jaw's only source for community news and information such as weather and classifieds.

Search the Biz Guide

Login